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Progression Point Examples in The Humanities – Geography


 

Progressing towards: Level 4 | Level 5 | Level 6     Progressing beyond: Level 6     Downloads | Show all

Progressing towards Level 4


  Progression point 3.25   Progression point 3.5   Progression point 3.75  
At 3.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 4 demonstrates, for example: At 3.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 4 demonstrates, for example: At 3.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 4 demonstrates, for example:
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • identification of natural processes; for example, rainfall and flood, earth movements and earthquakes, drought and bushfire
  • identification and understanding of the various types of land use and their distribution in Australia; for example; farming, forest, towns, parks
  • identification of human and physical characteristics of local community environments
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • identification of the impact of natural processes on the environment and population in a local area; for example, erosion and landslip, high rainfall and flooding in the school yard, bushfire and firefighting techniques 
  • identification of the impacts of various land uses on the environment; for example, the effect of land clearance on soil quality
  • identification and comparison of human and physical characteristics of environments within Australia
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • reporting on the impact of a natural process on an area in Australia; for example, annual rainfall, drought and cyclones
  • reporting of ways in which people protect the environment
  • identification of human and physical characteristics of local and global environments
Geospatial skills
  • identification of map conventions and features on published maps and other geographic imagery
  • collection and recording of data gathered from fieldwork; for example, physical characteristics of a local waterway
Geospatial skills
  • application of simple mapping conventions to self-drawn maps
  • organisation and presentation of fieldwork data
Geospatial skills
  • inclusion of the concepts of distance, location and direction where relevant in reports and maps
  • presentation, including further research, of fieldwork findings

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 4.

Level 4 standard

Geographic knowledge and understanding

At Level 4, students identify and describe Australia’s significant natural processes. They describe the reaction of people to these processes including the management of natural disasters. They compare the various ways humans have used and affected the Australian environment. Students recommend ways of protecting environmentally sensitive areas in a sustainable way. They provide examples and evidence based on their inquiries. They use geographic language to identify and describe the human and physical characteristics of local and global environments depicted by different kinds of maps, diagrams, photographs and satellite images.

Geospatial skills

At Level 4, students use atlases, street directories and town plan maps to accurately describe the distance, direction and location of places. They identify features from maps, satellite images, and oblique photographs. They draw sketch maps of their neighbourhood using simple mapping conventions such as title, scale, north point and legend. They research, collect, record and describe data obtained through field study surveys and measurements to form conclusions about the use of resources.

 
 
Progressing towards Level 5


  Progression point 4.25   Progression point 4.5   Progression point 4.75  
At 4.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 5 demonstrates, for example: At 4.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 5 demonstrates, for example: At 4.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 5 demonstrates, for example:
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • identification of the geographic characteristics of a chosen region; for example, Australia, Asia, the Pacific or Antarctica, or a region of Australia
  • identification and analysis of an environmental issue and its impact on a community; for example, forest use
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • explanation of how human activities and physical processes interact in a region; for example, the influence of weather patterns on farming in Australia
  • understanding of policies currently in place to manage an environmental issue; for example, responses to issues created by forest use, land degradation, or urbanisation at a local or regional level
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • identification of differences in interaction of human activities and physical processes between regions
  • investigation and evaluation of the sustainability of community proposals in response to an environmental issue; for example, mangrove plantings to protect against king tides, or ‘Clean Up Australia’ campaign to reduce litter
Geospatial skills
  • collection of information from a range of geographic media; for example, topographical maps, choropleth maps, graphs, tables, aerial photos, diagrams, and the appropriate use of presentation conventions
  • collection, recording, organisation and presentation of fieldwork data that satisfies conventions and includes description of fieldwork findings
Geospatial skills
  • collection of information from a range of data types; for example, topographical maps, choropleth maps, graphs, tables, aerial photos, diagrams and description of findings
  • collection and recording of fieldwork observations in a variety of ways that satisfies presentation conventions, and includes summaries of findings and conclusions
Geospatial skills
  • analysis of information from a range of geographic data to form a conclusion
  • collection, organisation and recording of fieldwork observations in a variety of ways that satisfies presentation conventions and includes summaries and analysis of findings

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 5.

Level 5 standard

Geographic knowledge and understanding

At Level 5, students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of the regions of Australia and those surrounding it: Asia, the Pacific and Antarctica. They explain, using examples, how the interaction of physical processes and human activities create variations within the regions. They use evidence and appropriate geographical language to explain contrasts within smaller regions surrounding Australia. Students describe differences in culture, living conditions and outlook, including attitudes to environmental issues, in these regions. They demonstrate understanding of environmental issues based on inquiry and propose ways of ensuring the sustainability of resources.

Geospatial skills

At Level 5, students collect geographical information from electronic and print media, including satellite images and atlas maps and analyse, evaluate and present it using a range of forms. They construct overlay theme maps using map conventions of scale, legend, title, and north point. They identify and gather geographical information from fieldwork and organise, process and communicate it using a range of written, oral, visual and graphic forms.

 
 
Progressing towards Level 6


  Progression point 5.25   Progression point 5.5   Progression point 5.75  
At 5.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 5.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 5.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example:
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • identification of local and global issues arising from the interaction of natural processes and human activities
  • identification and comparison of development issues from around the world and ways to measure differences; for example, the relationship between socio-economic status and life expectancy
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • research and reporting of the outcome of the interaction of natural processes and human activities; for example, desertification, land degradation or beach loss
  • explanation of a range of influences on a development issue; for example, social, historical, environmental, economic and political factors that influence food shortages in different areas
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • explanation of community responses to the interaction of human activities and natural processes; for example, land management, beach replenishment, revegetation or urbanisation
  • explanation of a development policy and its implications for sustainability; for example, water conservation, tourism, foreign aid
Geospatial skills
  • identification of information and patterns from a range of geographic data, with incorporation of spatial concepts in descriptions and explanations
  • collection, collation, presentation and interpretation of fieldwork data to explain a geographic situation
Geospatial skills
  • interpretation of a range of geographic data, with incorporation of spatial concepts in evaluations and proposals
  • use of geographic language and conventions, and the provision of well-supported explanations for findings of geographic fieldwork
Geospatial skills
  • interpretation of a variety of geographic data at a range of scales with use of spatial concepts in explanations, evaluations and proposals
  • fieldwork responses that include relevant data presentation conventions, explanations using geographic language, appropriate use of spatial concepts and application of geographic findings

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 6.

Level 6 standard

Geographic knowledge and understanding

At Level 6, students explain the operation of a major natural system and its interaction with human activities. They evaluate the consequences of the interaction and develop a policy to address an issue related to it. Students describe global patterns of development from a range of perspectives and identify and describe the factors that determine these patterns. They analyse development issues and formulate and evaluate comprehensive policies, including those for sustainable use and management of resources, to alter development patterns at a range of scales. They use evidence based on their inquiries and geographical language and concepts.

Geospatial skills

At Level 6, students accurately interpret information on different types of maps and photographs at a range of scales, and use map evidence to support explanations, draw inferences and predict associated outcomes. They collect and collate information gathered from fieldwork observations and present their findings observing geographical presentation conventions.

 
 
Progressing beyond Level 6


  Progression point 6.25   Progression point 6.5   Progression point 6.75  
At 6.25, the work of a student progressing beyond the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 6.5, the work of a student progressing beyond the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 6.75, the work of a student progressing beyond the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example:
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • use of high-order spatial concepts, such as spatial association, spatial change over time and spatial interaction, in explaining understandings
  • evaluation of existing policies and management practices that clearly addresses criteria, such as social, environmental and economic criteria, that relate to sustainability
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • formulation of policies based on evaluations that consider a range of perspectives for example; social, historical, environmental, economic, political, and technological
  • development of recommendations for policies that address issues, and take into account relevant elements of case studies and ‘real world’ examples
Geographic knowledge and understanding
  • use of high-order spatial concepts in explanations and in the provision of evidence
  • policy design based on the principles of sustainability, citing ‘real world’ examples and using criteria including time frame and scale
Geospatial skills
  • choice and justification of the most suitable geographic technique for an investigation
  • development of criteria for selecting suitable data needed to be collected for teacher-generated fieldwork, collection of that data, and successful communication of the findings
Geospatial skills
  • analysis of the suitability of geographic information and techniques for the study of a geographic issue
  • an individual plan for teacher-generated fieldwork, collection of data and successful communication of the findings
Geospatial skills
  • critical analysis of geographic data chosen to address a geographic issue
  • initiation of a fieldwork activity, collection of data, communication of findings and evaluation of the project
 

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