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Progression Point Examples in English

Progressing towards: Level 1 | Level 2 | Level 3 | Level 4 | Level 5 | Level 6     Progressing beyond: Level 6     Downloads | Show all

Progressing towards Level 1

In English, there is one point (0.5) at Level 1 for assessing student progress towards the Level 1 standard.

      Progression point 0.5      
  At 0.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 1 demonstrates, for example:  
  Reading
  • understanding of the directional sequence of text
  • recognition of some letters of the alphabet and awareness of the relationship between sounds and letters
  • correct reading of some familiar words; for example, words in the title of a simple reading text, or labels on objects in the classroom
  • retelling of the main ideas in a text; for example, the plot after listening to the reading of a picture story book or watching a video
  • predictions about events in a text from looking at the cover and illustrations
 
  Writing
  • understanding that their writing can communicate ideas, feelings and information
  • use of letters and some words in the writing of brief texts about topics of personal interest
  • emergent writing showing concepts about print, including left to right, top to bottom
  • reading back from their own writing at the time of writing
  • approximate use of letters for some letter–sound relationships and common words
  • use of a variety of writing tools, including crayons, pencils and computer software
 
  Speaking and listening
  • purposeful communication about personal experiences to peers and known adults
  • contribution of ideas to discussions
  • asking of simple questions in response to information presented by others
  • appropriate sequencing of a small number of ideas when speaking to others in familiar contexts
  • understanding of simple oral classroom instructions
 

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 1.

Level 1 standard

Reading

At Level 1, students match print and spoken text in their immediate environment. They recognise how sounds are represented alphabetically and identify some sound–letter relationships. They read aloud simple print and electronic texts that include some frequently used words and predominantly oral language structures. They read from left to right with return sweep, and from top to bottom. They use title, illustrations and knowledge of a text topic to predict meaning. They use context and information about words, letters, combinations of letters and the sounds associated with them to make meaning, and use illustrations to extend meaning.

Writing

At Level 1, students write personal recounts and simple texts about familiar topics to convey ideas or messages. In their writing, they use conventional letters, groups of letters, and simple punctuation such as full stops and capital letters. Students are aware of the sound system and the relationships between letters and sounds in words when spelling. They form letters correctly, and use a range of writing implements and software.

Speaking and listening

At Level 1, students use spoken language appropriately in a variety of classroom contexts. They ask and answer simple questions for information and clarification, contribute relevant ideas during class or group discussion, and follow simple instructions.

They listen to and produce brief spoken texts that deal with familiar ideas and information. They sequence main events and ideas coherently in speech, and speak at an appropriate volume and pace for listeners’ needs. They self-correct by rephrasing a statement or question when meaning is not clear.

 
 
Progressing towards Level 2


  Progression point 1.25   Progression point 1.5   Progression point 1.75  
At 1.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 2 demonstrates, for example: At 1.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 2 demonstrates, for example: At 1.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 2 demonstrates, for example:
Reading
  • naming of all uppercase and lowercase letters in the alphabet
  • identification of common sounds for letters
  • independent reading of simple print and electronic texts with moderate accuracy and fluency
  • accurate reading of high-frequency words
  • retelling of what they have read using the text as a prompt
  • prediction of what a text will be about, using textual features and some known words
  • understanding of differences between real and imaginative texts
Reading
  • segmentation and blending of letters in words of one or two syllables
  • use of sentence context, predictable structures and initial letters when attempting to read unfamiliar words
  • accurate and independent reading of print and electronic texts with high-frequency words
  • self-correction, on recognition that their own reading does not make sense
  • inclusion of main ideas in retelling what they have read
  • prediction of what might happen next in a story read independently
Reading
  • recognition of a wide range of letters and sounds, and blends in words of more than one syllable
  • use of strategies for working out the meaning of unfamiliar words in context; for example, sounding out, rereading, using cues from illustrations
  • self-correction, and use of punctuation to contribute to meaning when reading aloud; for example, recognition of quotation marks to identify a speaker’s words
  • ordered retelling of main ideas from a text they have read
  • response to ideas in short print and electronic literary texts
Writing
  • inclusion of their own experiences when writing for personal purposes and audiences such as in lists, letters, cards, posters
  • inclusion of one or more generally readable sentences
  • some correct use of capital letters and full stops
  • drawings that support the intended meaning of their writing
  • plausible attempts at spelling unfamiliar words, matching sound–letter relationships and using some simple spelling patterns
Writing
  • experimentation with a range of short text types; for example, recounts, letters, lists, procedures
  • sequencing of a small number of ideas in short texts for different purposes and audiences
  • rereading of their own writing, checking that it makes sense
  • combination of writing with drawings or computer graphics to support meaning
  • correct spelling of some high-frequency words and plausible attempts at spelling unfamiliar words
Writing
  • inclusion of information and ideas in short texts for known audiences and selected purposes
  • use of strategies to revise writing; for example, reading aloud, use of feedback from others
  • mostly correct use of capital letters, full stops, and question marks
  • correct spelling of unfamiliar words, using knowledge of sound–letter patterns
Speaking and listening
  • recount and description of familiar personal experiences when participating in discussions
  • turn-taking during group discussion
  • application of listening skills to a range of conversations and other spoken texts
  • appropriate responses to what others say
Speaking and listening
  • recounts and descriptions of familiar experiences in logical sequence
  • communication with others in small group situations
  • clear speech with simple phrases and sentences, and appropriate vocabulary
  • application of listening skills to a range of conversations, discussions and spoken texts; about real or imagined events
  • recall of what others say and answers to questions about details of what has been said
Speaking and listening
  • appropriate comments and questions in group activities
  • organisation of spoken texts, including features to signal when beginning to speak and when finishing
  • modification of tone and pace of speaking when communicating with others
  • responses, after application of listening skills, to conversations and texts about real and imaginary experiences
  • retelling of some main ideas after listening to stories and viewing videos

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 2.

Level 2 standard

Reading

At Level 2, students read independently and respond to short imaginative and informative texts with familiar ideas and information, predictable structures, and a small amount of unfamiliar vocabulary. They match sounds accurately to a range of letters, letter clusters and patterns, and work out the meaning of unfamiliar phrases and words in context. They locate directly stated information, retell ideas in sequence using vocabulary and phrases from the text, and interpret labelled diagrams. They predict plausible endings for stories and infer characters’ feelings. They self-correct when reading aloud and describe strategies used to gain meaning. They identify that texts are constructed by authors, and distinguish between texts that represent real and imaginary experience.

Writing

At Level 2, students write short sequenced texts that include some related ideas about familiar topics. They write texts that convey ideas and information to known audiences. They select content, form and vocabulary depending on the purpose for writing, and describe the purpose and audience for their own and others’ writing. They use appropriate structures to achieve some organisation of the subject matter. They link ideas in a variety of ways using pronouns, conjunctions and adverbial phrases indicating time and place. They accurately spell frequently used words, and make use of known spelling patterns to make plausible attempts at spelling unfamiliar words. They use capital letters, full stops and question marks correctly. They reread their own writing and use a range of editing resources to revise and clarify meaning. They write upper- and lower-case letters legibly with consistent size, slope and spacing.

Speaking and listening

At Level 2, students listen to and produce spoken texts that deal with familiar ideas and information. They demonstrate, usually in informal situations, that they are able to speak clearly using simple utterances and basic vocabulary. They organise spoken texts using simple features to signal beginnings and endings. They vary volume and intonation patterns to add emphasis. They contribute to group activities by making relevant comments and asking clarifying questions to facilitate communication. After listening to short live or recorded presentations, they recall some of the main ideas and information presented. They listen to others and respond appropriately to what has been said.

 
 

 

Progressing towards Level 3


  Progression point 2.25   Progression point 2.5   Progression point 2.75  
At 2.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 3 demonstrates, for example: At 2.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 3 demonstrates, for example: At 2.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 3 demonstrates, for example:
Reading
  • use of strategies for working out meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases in context of texts read independently; for example, suggestions of synonyms for familiar words
  • understanding of author’s purpose for writing a text; for example, to narrate, to inform, and of how well the text achieved its purpose
  • understanding of and responses to texts with several short paragraphs in print and electronic forms
  • comprehension of ideas in informative and imaginative texts
  • prediction of likely events and inferences about the consequence of actions represented in texts
Reading
  • use of strategies for reading texts with unfamiliar vocabulary and/or textual features such as captions for illustrations
  • understanding of main ideas in a range of informative and imaginative texts
  • recognition of connections between events in narrative texts
  • comparison of information presented in different texts about the same topic
  • discussion of events and characters’ actions in imaginative texts in the light of their own experience
Reading
  • use of their own knowledge of language structures and features in reading texts that present new and unfamiliar ideas and information
  • reading of and responses to imaginative and informative texts, organised in a range of ways such as texts structured in short chapters, or linked sections of electronic texts
  • note-taking and recording of key information from a range of texts
  • recognition of how authors choose language to describe characters and events; for example, short sentences to build up to a climax, descriptive words to set a scene
  • inferences about characters’ motivations and intentions in imaginative texts
Writing
  • composition of short, sequenced factual and imaginative texts in print and electronic forms
  • related ideas, linked in sequence, to convey meaning to known audiences
  • simple, and some compound, sentences joined by appropriate conjunctions
  • effective vocabulary to convey meaning, including nouns, verbs and adjectives
  • correct spelling of words with regular spelling patterns and plausible attempts at some words with irregular spelling patterns
Writing
  • composition of short texts of more than one paragraph to describe experiences, tell a story, express a point of view
  • appropriate ordering of events and ideas in print and electronic texts
  • compound sentences linking two ideas or events, with correct use of verb tenses
  • development of character, setting and plot in short narrative texts
  • correct use of full stops and question marks, and experimentation with other punctuation; for example, commas, quotation marks
Writing
  • composition of texts for different purposes; for example, to narrate, inform, describe, present a point of view or explain
  • composition of texts of three or four logically ordered paragraphs
  • composition of texts that take account of the needs and interests of familiar and some unfamiliar audiences
  • combinations of written and visual elements in print and electronic texts
  • correct spelling of two-syllable words with regular spelling patterns, and plausible attempts at spelling two-syllable words with irregular spelling patterns
Speaking and listening
  • familiar ideas and information for specified audiences and purposes in spoken texts
  • clear speech in informal and classroom situations
  • contribution of relevant ideas to discussions and asking of questions to clarify meaning
  • retelling of some main ideas and information from texts read and viewed in class
  • attentive listening to others in individual and group contexts
Speaking and listening
  • participation for extended periods in small group situations
  • adjustments of tone, volume and pace of their speech in order to communicate clearly
  • rephrasing of spoken texts to clarify meaning when questioned by listeners
  • comprehension by retelling what they heard, including identification of key points
  • appropriate responses to what others say in individual and group contexts
Speaking and listening
  • preparation and delivery of short explanations and reports to peers on topics of interest
  • communication of relevant information and responses to questions when speaking to others in a range of familiar contexts
  • modification of spoken texts to clarify meaning and react to audience feedback
  • attentive listening to spoken texts, and accurate retelling of key information

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 3.

Level 3 standard

Reading

At Level 3, students read and respond to an increasing range of imaginative and informative texts with some unfamiliar ideas and information, vocabulary and textual features. They interpret the main ideas and purpose of texts. They make inferences from imaginative text about plot and setting and about characters’ qualities, motives and actions. They infer meaning from material presented in informative texts. They identify how language is used to represent information, characters, people, places and events in different ways including identification of some simple symbolic meanings and stereotypes. They use several strategies to locate, select and record key information from texts.

Writing

At Level 3, students write texts containing several logically ordered paragraphs that express opinions and include ideas and information about familiar topics. They write narratives which include characters, setting and plot. They order information and sequence events using some detail or illustrative evidence, and they express a point of view providing some information and supporting detail. They combine verbal and visual elements in the texts they produce. They meet the needs of audiences by including appropriate background information.

They write a variety of simple and compound sentences and use verb tenses correctly. They use punctuation to support meaning, including exclamation marks and quotation marks, and accurately use full stops, commas and question marks. They use vocabulary appropriate to context and spell most one- and two-syllable words with regular spelling patterns, and frequently used words which have less regular spelling patterns. They use sound and visual patterns when attempting to spell unfamiliar words.

Speaking and listening

At Level 3, students vary their speaking and listening for a small range of contexts, purposes and audiences. They project their voice adequately for an audience, use appropriate spoken language features, and modify spoken texts to clarify meaning and information.

They listen attentively to spoken texts, including factual texts, and identify the topic, retell information accurately, ask clarifying questions, volunteer information and justify opinions.

 
 
Progressing towards Level 4


  Progression point 3.25   Progression point 3.5   Progression point 3.75  
At 3.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 4 demonstrates, for example: At 3.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 4 demonstrates, for example: At 3.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 4 demonstrates, for example:
Reading
  • interpretations of and responses to a range of literary and everyday texts
  • understanding of how authors construct print and electronic texts for different intended audiences and purposes; for example, a letter to a friend or report for the school newsletter
  • connections between evidence stated and inferred in texts and their own knowledge and experience to clarify understanding of texts
  • predictions and inferences about possible consequences of actions and events during reading
  • recognition that texts reflect sociocultural values, attitudes and beliefs
Reading
  • identification of the intended purposes of a wide range of literary and everyday texts
  • understanding of features of different kinds of texts; for example, characterisation and plot in narratives, or headings and visual information in informative texts
  • use of evidence drawn from the text to support interpretations
  • use of strategies for interpreting texts with unfamiliar ideas and vocabulary; for example, reading on and reading back, summarising or paraphrasing
  • identification of sociocultural values, attitudes and beliefs represented in literary texts
Reading
  • interpretations of and responses to a wide range of print and multimodal texts
  • understanding and discussion of the textual features of different texts; for example, sequence of ideas in persuasive texts
  • analysis and discussion of a range of perspectives presented in different texts on the same topic
  • use of a variety of comprehension strategies; for example, reviewing, summarising, asking questions or predicting
  • identification of the ways in which texts present a range of values and attitudes
Writing
  • inclusion of familiar ideas and information for different purposes and audiences in print and electronic texts
  • use of strategies for planning, drafting, proofreading, editing and revising
  • appropriate vocabulary, punctuation and tense according to context, purpose and audience
  • typical features and structures of different texts such as narratives and reports
  • correct spelling of frequently occurring two- and three-syllable words and use of strategies to spell unknown words
Writing
  • production of texts for a range of different audiences and purposes in print and electronic forms
  • use of strategies for planning; for example, using models of others’ writing or mind mapping
  • deletion of unnecessary information or addition of new information when editing and revising writing
  • inclusion of appropriate visual images and information in print and electronic texts
Writing
  • use of structures and features appropriate to purpose and audience of print and electronic texts
  • appropriate use of topic sentences and organisation of main and subordinate ideas
  • selection of vocabulary, text structures and visual features to effectively communicate ideas and information
  • maintenance of plot, characterisation and setting throughout extended narrative texts
  • use of knowledge about spelling patterns, including morphemic knowledge, visual and phonic patterns
Speaking and listening
  • awareness of purpose and audience in short presentations
  • active contribution to the preparation and presentation of performances when working with small groups
  • relevant questioning to clarify meaning of others’ presentations
  • attentive listening to a range of spoken texts, live and recorded, about familiar ideas and information
Speaking and listening
  • consideration of purpose and audience in preparation of presentations
  • variation in tone, volume, and pace of speech to add emphasis
  • use of multimedia to enhance meaning when communicating ideas and information to others
  • attentive listening and appropriate responses to spoken and multimodal texts that include unfamiliar ideas and information
Speaking and listening
  • rehearsal of presentations, with attention to variation of pace, volume, pitch and pronunciation to enhance meaning
  • constructive responses to verbal and non-verbal audience feedback; for example, by rephrasing for clarification
  • identification of main ideas and some supporting details in spoken and multimodal texts
  • summary of main ideas after listening to others’ presentations

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 4.

Level 4 standard

Reading

At Level 4, students read, interpret and respond to a wide range of literary, everyday and media texts in print and in multimodal formats. They analyse these texts and support interpretations with evidence drawn from the text. They describe how texts are constructed for particular purposes, and identify how sociocultural values, attitudes and beliefs are presented in texts. They analyse imagery, characterisation, dialogue, point of view, plot and setting. They use strategies such as reading on, using contextual cues, and drawing on knowledge of text organisation when interpreting texts containing unfamiliar ideas and information.

Writing

At Level 4, students produce, in print and electronic forms, a variety of texts for different purposes using structures and features of language appropriate to the purpose, audience and context of the writing. They begin to use simple figurative language and visual images. They use a range of vocabulary, a variety of sentence structures, and use punctuation accurately, including apostrophes. They identify and use different parts of speech, including nouns, pronouns, adverbs, comparative adverbs and adjectives, and use appropriate prepositions and conjunctions. They use a range of approaches to spelling, applying morphemic knowledge and an understanding of visual and phonic patterns. They employ a variety of strategies for writing, including note-making, using models, planning, editing and proofreading.

Speaking and listening

At Level 4, students plan, rehearse and make presentations for different purposes. They sustain a point of view and provide succinct accounts of personal experiences or events. They adjust their speaking to take account of context, purpose and audience, and vary tone, volume and pace of speech to create or emphasise meaning.

When listening to spoken texts, they identify the main idea and supporting details and summarise them for others. They identify opinions offered by others, propose other relevant viewpoints and extend ideas in a constructive manner.

 
 
Progressing towards Level 5


  Progression point 4.25   Progression point 4.5   Progression point 4.75  
At 4.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 5 demonstrates, for example: At 4.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 5 demonstrates, for example: At 4.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 5 demonstrates, for example:
Reading
  • personal responses to a range of texts; for example, written reviews or role-plays
  • use of knowledge of text organisation to interpret texts containing unfamiliar ideas and information
  • identification and explanations of different interpretations of texts
  • explanations of how authors of print and multimodal texts use a variety of techniques to engage audiences
  • identification of strategies used by authors to persuade others to share a point of view
Reading
  • responses to a range of personal, imaginative, informative and persuasive texts
  • discussion and exploration of ideas and issues presented in a wide range of texts
  • identification of key ideas by skimming, scanning and use of topic sentences
  • explanations about how a text can be interpreted from a variety of perspectives
  • recognition that texts are produced for multiple audiences, purposes and contexts
  • use of evidence from a text to support their own interpretations
Reading
  • development of extended personal responses to a range of texts in oral and dramatic presentations, print and multimodal forms
  • discussion of different views and values presented in texts
  • use of a range of strategies for interpreting texts, including formulation of questions, comparison of different texts, and identification of cause-and-effect connections
  • comparison of how information and ideas are presented in a variety of ways in different texts
  • critical evaluation of information presented in print and multimodal texts
Writing
  • composition of print and electronic texts for a range of purposes, including speculative, imaginative, explanatory and persuasive
  • development of topics in coherent ways according to the purpose, and the needs and experience of the intended audience
  • use of a variety of sentence structures, including combinations of simple and compound sentences for particular effects
  • awareness of grammatical conventions; for example, tense and subject–verb agreement, appropriate punctuation
  • use of a range of planning strategies
Writing
  • composition of print and electronic texts in a wide range of forms, including narratives, reports, explanations, procedures and points of view
  • composition of persuasive texts about contemporary issues, including justification of personal points of view with supporting arguments
  • experimentation with different techniques to influence audiences and achieve the intended purpose of their writing
  • correct spelling, except of unfamiliar words with unusual spelling patterns
  • use of headings and subheadings in the organisation of information in texts
  • use of editing and proofreading skills for clarity and cohesion of ideas
Writing
  • control of writing texts in various forms, including narratives, reports, explanations, procedures and persuasive texts
  • composition of imaginative and informative texts presenting challenging ideas and issues
  • appropriate use of figurative language to achieve particular effects
  • strategic use of headings, subheadings, graphics, photographs and art work to support the meaning of the text
  • use of a variety of software packages to plan, organise, revise and present electronic texts
Speaking and listening
  • use of some multimodal texts to support meaning in presentations for a variety of purposes and audiences
  • understanding of features of effective oral communication and use of these understandings in evaluating others’ presentations
  • a range of oral responses to texts, themes and issues
  • responsive listening to a range of spoken texts, including small group discussions that deal with common themes of interest
Speaking and listening
  • use of detail and supporting evidence when speaking about their own opinions and ideas
  • use of introductions, conclusions and visual support materials appropriate to the purpose, audience and context
  • awareness of the needs and interests of the audience in development of their own spoken texts
  • questioning that clarifies and builds on ideas presented by others
  • inclusion of main ideas when taking notes from others’ presentations
Speaking and listening
  • selection of appropriate features of spoken language to shape a text for a specific audience and purpose
  • use of a range of strategies to influence audiences; for example, imagery, humour, anecdotes or emotive language
  • development of a range of spoken texts that deal with challenging ideas and issues, including informative, imaginative and persuasive texts
  • use of supporting evidence for their own opinions about others’ presentations
  • use of graphic organisers to assist with note-taking and summaries of key ideas from spoken texts

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 5.

Level 5 standard

Reading

At Level 5, students read and view imaginative, informative and persuasive texts that explore ideas and information related to challenging topics, themes and issues. They identify the ideas, themes and issues explored in these texts, and provide supporting evidence to justify their interpretations. They produce personal responses, for example, interpretive pieces and character profiles. They infer meanings and messages in texts, analyse how social values or attitudes are conveyed, compare the presentation of information and ideas in different texts, and identify cause and effect in informative texts.

Writing

At Level 5, students produce, in print and electronic forms, texts for a variety of purposes, including speculating, hypothesising, persuading and reflecting. They write extended narratives or scripts with attention to characterisation, consistency of viewpoint and development of a resolution. They write arguments that state and justify a personal viewpoint; reports incorporating challenging themes and issues; personal reflections on, or evaluations of, texts presenting challenging themes and issues. Students improve the accuracy and readability of their writing, developing confidence in the identification and use of grammatical conventions and features of language and in their use of figurative language. They use a range of punctuation accurately to support meaning, including the use of ellipses, dashes, colons and semi-colons. They control tenses, and subject–verb and noun–pronoun agreement. They accurately identify and use different parts of speech. They edit their writing for clarity, coherence and consistency of style, and proofread and correct spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors.

Speaking and listening

At Level 5, students express creative and analytical responses to texts, themes and issues. They identify main issues in a topic and provide supporting detail and evidence for opinions. They critically evaluate the spoken language of others and select, prepare and present spoken texts for specific audiences and purposes. They use a variety of multimodal texts to support individual presentations in which they inform or persuade an audience.

When listening to others, students ask clarifying questions and build on the ideas of others. They identify key ideas and take notes. They show an awareness of the influence of audience on the construction and presentation of spoken texts, and of how situational and sociocultural factors affect audience responses.

Progressing towards Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, Level 4, Level 6 and Beyond Level 6

 
 

 

Progressing towards Level 6


  Progression point 5.25   Progression point 5.5   Progression point 5.75  
At 5.25, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 5.5, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 5.75, the work of a student progressing towards the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example:
Reading
  • responses to a variety of texts that explore a range of ideas and issues
  • discussion of how the use of language varies according to context, purpose and audience
  • comparison of texts that present issues and ideas in a variety of ways
  • responses to a wide range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts in oral, written and multimodal forms
  • summary and presentation of information and ideas on a topic from several different texts
Reading
  • discussion of how contemporary and classical literary texts explore ideas and issues relevant to their own lives
  • understanding of how variations in language, form and context affect interpretations of texts
  • explorations of how texts vary according to context and purpose; for example, contemporary newspaper stories, classical fables, narrative poems, lyrics of popular songs
  • personal responses to key ideas and issues in literary texts in oral, dramatic, written and multimodal presentations
  • identification of different perspectives and information used in texts presenting a range of points of view
Reading
  • reflection on ideas and issues relevant to their own lives that are explored in imaginative, informative and persuasive texts
  • discussion of the impact of aspects of texts; for example, the use of imagery and symbolism
  • identification of multiple purposes within the same texts; for example, editorials intended to inform, warn or persuade
  • critical analyses of and responses to a wide range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts
  • use of metalanguage to compare features of different kinds of texts such as play scripts, films, novels
Writing
  • composition of sustained narratives with some control of main plot and sub-plots and consistent character development
  • use of writing to explore complex issues and points of view
  • use of a variety of language techniques to present an argument and influence audiences to share a point of view
  • effective use of vocabulary and sentence structures appropriate to the intended purpose of the text
  • effective use of strategies for redrafting, editing for audience appropriateness, prioritising and sequencing ideas
Writing
  • expression of thoughts, feelings, opinions and ideas in print and electronic forms
  • use of writing to explore complex issues and to argue for a particular point of view
  • integration of complex ideas and multiple perspectives in writing
  • the written conventions, structures and features appropriate for a range of different text types
  • proofreading and redrafting for accuracy, clarity, coherence and consistency of style
Writing
  • composition of expressive and sustained narratives with attention to chronology, coherence of viewpoint, consistency of plot and character development, and development of effective resolution
  • use of writing to explore, speculate and reflect on complex themes and issues
  • strong arguments for particular points of view, using effective language to persuade readers
  • evaluation of the extent to which they have been effective in meeting the demands of purpose, audience and context in their writing
  • use of a range of strategies for gathering information, planning, structuring, composing, proofreading, revising and editing
Speaking and listening
  • presentation of a range of spoken text types; for example, anecdotes, reports, speeches, debates
  • contributions to discussions with peers to compare ideas, express opinions and develop conclusions about themes and issues
  • analysis of relationships between texts, contexts, speakers and listeners
  • effective use of features of spoken language to influence specific audiences
  • identification of criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of spoken presentations
Speaking and listening
  • use of evidence to justify and support opinions
  • critical analysis of the relationship between spoken texts, contexts, speakers and listeners
  • selection of persuasive language and non-verbal techniques to influence specific audiences
  • responsive listening to a range of spoken texts dealing with complex subject matter
Speaking and listening
  • comparison and contrast of the use of language and multimedia in spoken texts in different contexts
  • identification of key ideas and information in order to develop responses to spoken texts
  • presentation of coherent arguments for particular points of view using evidence to systematically support the point of view
  • critical responses to a range of spoken texts dealing with complex subject matter

The learning focus statement provides advice about learning experiences that will assist students to work towards the achievement of the standards at Level 6.

Level 6 standard

Reading

At Level 6, students read, view, analyse, critique, reflect on and discuss contemporary and classical imaginative texts that explore personal, social, cultural and political issues of significance to their own lives. They also read, view, analyse and discuss a wide range of informative and persuasive texts and identify the multiple purposes for which texts are created. They explain how texts are shaped by the time, place and cultural setting in which they are created. They compare and contrast the typical features of particular texts and synthesise information from different texts to draw conclusions.

Writing

At Level 6, students write sustained and cohesive narratives that experiment with different techniques and show attention to chronology, characterisation, consistent point of view and development of a resolution. They write persuasive texts dealing with complex ideas and issues and control the linguistic structures and features that support the presentation of different perspectives on complex themes and issues. They select subject matter and begin to use a range of language techniques to try to position readers to accept particular views of people, characters, events, ideas and information. They compose a range of other texts, such as feature articles, webpages and workplace texts. They plan and deliver presentations, sequencing and organising complex ideas. They write accurately punctuated, grammatically sound and complex sentences with embedded clauses and phrases. They are able to maximise the effects of rhythm and tone, and write with developing fluency. They proofread and edit their own writing for accuracy, consistency and clarity.

Speaking and listening

At Level 6, students analyse critically the relationship between texts, contexts, speakers and listeners in a range of situations. When engaged in discussion, they compare ideas, build on others’ ideas, provide and justify other points of view, and reach conclusions that take account of aspects of an issue. In their presentations, they make effective use of the structures and features of spoken language to deal with complex subject matter in a range of situations.

They draw on a range of strategies to listen to and present spoken texts, including note-taking, combining spoken and visual texts, and presenting complex issues or information imaginatively to interest an audience.

 
 
Progressing beyond Level 6


  Progression point 6.25   Progression point 6.5   Progression point 6.75  
At 6.25, the work of a student progressing beyond the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 6.5, the work of a student progressing beyond the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example: At 6.75, the work of a student progressing beyond the standard at Level 6 demonstrates, for example:
Reading
  • knowledge of the structures, features and conventions used by authors to construct meaning in texts
  • language appropriate for discussion, analysis and reflection of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts
  • use of strategies for developing responses to a wide range of print and electronic texts, including presentation of ideas and issues of significance in their own lives
  • comparisons of typical features of different kinds of texts
  • use of textual features and evidence from texts to support oral, written and multimodal responses to a wide range of texts
Reading
  • knowledge of the structures, features and conventions used by authors to construct meaning in a range of print, non-print and multimodal texts
  • critical analysis of ideas, themes, characters and settings presented in a range of literary texts
  • recognition and discussion of values, points of view and ideas presented in a variety of texts
  • comparisons of how linguistic structures and features of texts can be used to position readers and viewers
  • discussion of the influences on different readers’ interpretations of texts
Reading
  • knowledge of the structures, features and conventions used by authors to construct meaning in a range of literary texts
  • exploration and critical analysis of key ideas, characters and themes presented in a wide range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts
  • critical analysis of social, historical and/or cultural values presented in texts
  • discussion and comparisons of possible interpretations of texts supported by evidence from the texts
  • exploration of how meaning is constructed through written language and visual images
Writing
  • knowledge of the structures and features of a range of print, non-print and multimodal texts intended for different purposes and audiences
  • selection of text type, subject matter and language to suit particular audiences, purposes and contexts
  • effective planning and organisation of coherent and logical points of view in print and electronic texts
  • use of strategies for planning and revision of written texts to achieve coherence of form and language structures
  • general control of the conventions of spelling, punctuation and syntax
Writing
  • appropriate choices of specific structures and features for the chosen audience, purpose and context; for example, style, images, point of view, tone, register
  • selection and shaping of information, ideas and arguments appropriate for the chosen form, audience, purpose and context
  • use of strategies for the construction of sustained, coherent and logical arguments
  • use of a range of strategies for the creation, review and editing of written texts
Writing
  • creation of sustained and coherent written texts for specified audiences and purposes
  • choices of structures and forms that show understanding of the relationship between purpose, form, language and audience in a range of print, non-print and multimodal texts
  • explanations of their decisions about form, purpose, language, audience and context in their own writing
  • use of appropriate strategies to review and edit texts for fluency and coherence
  • consistent control of the conventions of spelling, punctuation and syntax
Speaking and listening
  • understanding of ways of developing constructive interactions with others; for example, building on others’ ideas
  • selection of text type, subject matter and language to suit a specific audience, purpose and context
  • knowledge of the structures, features and conventions used by speakers to construct meaning
  • understanding of the effects of form, context, audience and purpose on speakers’ choices of structure and language
  • active listening and appropriate responses to others’ views during discussion
Speaking and listening
  • use of strategies for constructing sustained, coherent and logical arguments using spoken language
  • use of key elements of oral language conventions and usage in a range of text types
  • application of oral conventions in a chosen oral text type; for example, speech, dramatic presentation, debate
  • understanding of the relationship between purpose, form, language and audience in a range of oral text types
  • critical analysis of others’ oral presentations and the ways in which speakers construct meaning
Speaking and listening
  • participation in discussion and debate, drawing on the ideas and arguments presented by others
  • selection and shaping of information, ideas and arguments appropriate to the chosen form, audience, purpose and context
  • planning, rehearsal and revision of oral presentations for fluency and coherence
  • understanding of the relationship between purpose, form, language and audience in a range of oral and multimodal text types
  • recognition of the ways in which speakers express or imply a point of view and values
 
 

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